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Canada’s Drag Race Season 1 Exit Interview: Lemon

Here’s what Lemon had to say following her elimination from the 8th episode of Canada’s Drag Race
 
During Thursday night’s episode of Canada’s Drag Race, Lemon and Rita Baga had to lip-sync for their lives, to Alanis Morissette’s “You Oughta Know,” with Lemon being asked to sashay away.
 
Here’s what Lemon had to say about her experience on the show:
 
You said right at the end, “I want people to know that sometimes the mean girl in the movie has a kind heart.” So how much of your persona was strategic?
“I’ve always had a soft spot for the mean girl in the movie, the Sharpay Evans in High School Musical, the Regina George (in Mean Girls), I always felt like these are powerful women who are, you know, in charge of what they want. And then everyone around them thinks they’re too mean, or too this, or too that. I always felt bad for them. So I built Lemon off the idea of, maybe she’s a mean girl, but she’s not evil. She just asks for what she wants.”
 
Making it to the top five is a real achievement, but evaluating it objectively, do you have a theory on why you were sent home?
“I mean, honestly, this competition is so wild. Any tiny mistake can cost you. There were only five girls left, and someone had to go. It just so happened it wasn’t my week, and Rita out lip-synced me. But I’m still so proud of myself for everything I did.”
 
What’s harder about this than it looks on TV?
“Everything! Everything is a thousand times faster than you expect. I am a fan, I love Drag Race so much, and I always have, and sometimes you see things on TV and you’re like, ‘How does she not know her lines? She had all this time to prepare!’ But no, no, no. It’s harder than anything I’ve ever done, and I’ve done a lot of really hard s—.” (winks).
 
What did you think of the judging overall?
“I was a competitive dancer, so I know it doesn’t really matter if I have opinions about it, because I’m not being paid to be a judge. There’s no way to directly qualify drag being good or bad – it’s an art form, and it’s all opinion-based. So whatever the judges’ opinions were, they were right. Because they were the ones sitting behind the table. I think they’re all really cool people, and they’re all incredibly qualified to be there. You can’t fault them for having opinions when their job was to have opinions. Would I have seen certain things differently? Yeah, probably. But was I paid to be a judge? Sure as f— wasn’t.”
 
So what’s next for you?
“I just want to take over everything. I want to be everywhere, all the time. I want every person, when they think of Lemon, to forget that there’s even a fruit.”
 
On a more serious note, what was it like working with the Rainbow Railroad refugees? One of your competitors commented, “Even Lemon can’t be a bitch today.”
“I think I’m very lucky that I was still there for that experience. I learned so much from them. I feel like all of us had a different perspective on being queer, and being Canadian, and how lucky we are. This was a real slap of a reality check. Like, you guys are fighting over beauty blenders, when this is going on in the world? I don’t mean to minimize anything, everyone has things that make them upset, and that’s okay. But this was a nice way to look at the whole world and realize how privileged we are. I’m so glad I got to experience it first-hand.”
 

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